Tom Critchlow
experiments in hypertext thinking
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https://www.amazon.com/Hippie-Modernism-Struggle-Greg-Castillo/dp/1935963090

JG Ballard - The Drowned World, High Rise (via Gabe)

These office culture books: https://srconstantin.wordpress.com/2019/01/10/book-recommendations-an-everyone-culture-and-moral-mazes/

http://aworkinglibrary.com/reading/ka/

Words without music philip glass - https://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1631491431/wwwaustinkleo-20/ref=nosim/ from: https://austinkleon.com/2018/10/05/take-your-kid-to-work/

Same same Peter Mendulsend

Gnomon: https://desert.glass/newsletter/week-8/

ABC of reading - recc by Brian

How to do nothing - jenny odel

roadside picnic

Void Star! Is really good and central character is a contractor who can talk to AIs https://twitter.com/speckledwords/status/1121814387478663173

Invisible cities (Italo Calvino): This book reads like a hazy solipsistic opium dream, hovering somewhere between poetry and prose. Highly recommended if you’re fascinated by cities; its expansive, wandering style, crawling along the stones and streets of imagined cities like fingers stroking Braille, reminded me of Sohrab Sepehri’s The Lover is Always Alone, which is one of my favorite books of all time.

The housekeeper and the professor

Always coming home

The club of queer trades

Good source of books here: my years of reading

https://rogerstrunk.com/library

Train dreams recommended by Robin Sloan

Tons of good sci-fi reccs in this thread

Including:

The Dazzle of Day, by Molly Gloss

The Art of Community (Spencer Heath MacCallum): I’ve been looking for reading about commercial buildings as microcosmic “cities” and finally found this book, published in 1970, through a friend. Within the first few pages, I wanted to reach across the fifty-year divide and clasp hands with the author. MacCallum asks, “Is a hotel a community?” and proceeds to explore the idea of “proprietary communities”, such as shopping malls, airplanes, and RV parks, where unaffiliated individuals are bound by the contracts they make to the proprietor of an organization. MacCallum argues that sovereignty (or “institutionalized force”) is merely an awkward transition between “primitive” and proprietary communities, both of which represent the true best form of social organization. (Unsurprisingly, his grandfather was an ex-Georgist.) I didn’t agree with everything in this book, but it left me with a lot of good questions. It made me think about the ways in which big tech companies are also proprietary communities (consider the recent WIRED piece about Google’s internal culture!). It also gave me some missing vocabulary I’ve needed to express how one-to-many communities are structured differently from many-to-many communities (ex. an open source maintainer is often a sole proprietor who allocates scarce resources, like attention, on behalf of all contributors). I desperately want to talk to someone about this book; it looks like I snagged the last copy on Amazon, but it’s also available via Internet Archive here. Perhaps one day some kind soul will republish this book and give it the love it deserves.

from here

https://www.amazon.com/Architecture-City-Oppositions-Books/dp/0262680432/ref=olp_product_details?_encoding=UTF8&me=

https://monoskop.org/images/1/16/Rossi_Aldo_The_Architecture_of_the_City_1982_OCR_parts_missing.pdf

The Future of Another Timeline

Thrilling Cities by Ian Fleming

https://www.amazon.com/Night-Heron-Adam-Brookes/dp/0316273090

This week, I finished the third in the trilogy by Adam Burkes that begins with Night Heron, continues into Spy Games, and concludes with The Spy’s Daughter, and I can report to you that they are the best spy novels I’ve read in years. Legitimately gripping—I stayed up late to finish the last one—and totally literary. Also: usefully contemporary, with some very nice depictions of some deeply unglamorous tradecraft, including one detailed sequence that follows a character on the run and manages to make VPNs thrilling.

From Robin Sloan

Jitterbug perfume

https://www.dukeupress.edu/technocrats-of-the-imagination

Chris Butler: The Dark Beyond the Stars? Good stuff. Also, The Listeners (by James Gunn) is good linquistic/first contact/science v religion sci-fi.

Matt Webb: Have you read The Book of Strange New Things? Blew me away. A very different book but also space-missionary sf

aaron lewis is reading: https://press.uchicago.edu/ucp/books/book/chicago/M/bo20069392.html

From Brian: https://www.amazon.com/Grendel-John-Gardner/dp/0679723110

The Sunken Land Begins to Rise Again

!&
@tomcritchlow