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The Public Necessity of Student Blogging

https://twitter.com/tobyshorin/status/1131619923082526720

Blogging practices of knowledge workers - Dissertation PDF!

I’ve been publishing to my Amazon.com internal blog since May 10th, 2004. During that time I’ve unintentionally developed my own blogging style, and I’ve learned a thing or two about writing blogs. I figured I’d pass along some thoughts about blogging in the hope that it’s useful.

source: you-should-write-blogs - steveyegge2

Google slides as blog

Summary: in this post I explain why you should start a blog (to help others and to help yourself), what to write about, and how to start it. I hope to persuade you that you should start a blog even if you feel that you have nothing to say and even if almost nobody will read it.

source: Why You Should Start a Blog Right Now - Alexey Guzey

After Tatiana Mac proposed to bring webrings back, I hacked something new together over the weekend: A starter kit for hosting your own webring!

source: [A Webring Kit Max Böck - Frontend Web Developer](https://mxb.dev/blog/webring-kit/)

Ideas are fascinators that sparkle and dangle in front of the creator, distracting an eager audience from the person behind the curtain. Submitting to the tyranny of ideas gives us the freedom to explore who we are apart from our public reputations. If ideas are living entities that exist separately from our selves, what remains of us?

source: [Nadia Eghbal The tyranny of ideas](https://nadiaeghbal.com/ideas)

The catch is, a Wild Thoughts blog can only be a source of renewal and rebirth if it remains wild. For that, it must remain free. In a way, I am like Max, and I’ve decided not to go back for my supper from the land of Wild Thoughts. Instead, I’ve pitched a tent inside, and put up a trading post at the periphery. Visiting me in the woods is free. Stuff at the trading post costs money.

source: Where the Wild Thoughts Are (from 2011!)

While reading The Death and Life of Great American Cities, I was struck by how applicable many of her observations were to the internet today, despite being published twenty years before its invention.

One of the most useful concepts I picked up is her treatment of public and private life, which I’d like to break down in this post. We tend to think of privacy as a binary distinction, but Jacob identifies several types of public-private life which, I think, can help us think and talk about our online interactions today.

source: [Nadia Eghbal Reclaiming public life](https://nadiaeghbal.com/public-life)
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@tomcritchlow